Howdy Guest!  / Create an account
Thread Rating:
  • 5 Vote(s) - 4.8 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
How To Get Rid Of Demons!
#21
(05-21-2009, 03:06 AM)Haunted Wrote: I totally agree Warrior, a lot of churches don't discuss the parts of the bible that deal with demons. I think the reason they don't is because they're afraid of them. Many people think that casting out demons is something that only God can do, they don't realize that through him we have power over them as well.

I believe that all churches ie organized religion, pick and choose what they want to follow AND they add a lot of their own 'man made' stuff too. From my experience (I have attended many different churches) there are a lot of good hearted sincere people but most of what they follow are just man made traditions instead of the book they claim to be following.

(05-21-2009, 03:06 AM)Haunted Wrote: Loved your post UglyNRude and I do totally agree with a lot of it. There are a lot of outside factors as well as health factors that can produce the same results as a haunting, the paranormal, demonic oppression or demonic possession. But, I can guarantee you one thing, not all cases are caused by something so simple.

Demons are real and I look forward to the day that you post a thread telling us about your experiences with one. Believe me, it will completely change your life when you do run upon one.

I also want to say excellent post UglyNRude - I do feel that a lot of cases in regards to demons can be explained as something "normal" but there are in fact demons in this world and there are many people who are oppressed or even possessed by them. But as with anything else of this nature it generally takes a personal experience before one believes.

Now I am no expert on demons by a long shot. I cannot say for certain exactly what they are or where they come from but I do "know" that they exist.

The presence of those seeking the truth is infinitely to be preferred to the presence of those who think they've found it. ~ Terry Pratchett

The Paranormal Beliefs Survey  ~^*White face*^~  Paranormal Questions & Answers
Reply
#22
I totally agree CareTaker, too many churches pick and choose parts of the bible that they "want" to believe, or want to live by. Organized religion has been a big part of what's got the world in the shape it's in now and it just keeps getting worse.
I totally agree CareTaker, too many churches pick and choose parts of the bible that they "want" to believe, or want to live by. Organized religion has been a big part of what's got the world in the shape it's in now and it just keeps getting worse.

Some people choose their religion just like they choose a car. It's like ok I don't want or need this, this and that so let's move on to the next model. There's a religion out there somewhere for everyone no matter how you want to live.

I'm sure if you love to steal, lie and cheat that there's a religion that teaches that you can do that all you want and still be a "good" Christian!
Reply
#23
I also want to thank you Haunting for these informative pieces of evidence...you are much appreciated. I have a question and maybe you might have an answer or just an opinion to suggest.

In regards to giving an invitation to an evil spirit, I've heard be it through my Christian background or somewhere else, that when people engage in a "sexual union" that spiritual ties can be passed through one another. Something called "soulish ties" that can transfer to another soul via sexual encounters. Soulish ties, can mean only emotional traits, bad habits, certain addiction behavior, etc. But, do you think this could also mean that a demonic entity could be passed through one another within a sexual union. I've never heard of a case like such, but I don't see why this wouldn't occur.

If one sexual encounter with a person who has an addictive personality could transfer an addictive habit through soulish ties to that other person, then surely a demon could pass to another after engaging in sex. Have you heard anything like this, or ever heard of soulish ties? Just a thought.
Reply
#24
You don't even need a soulish tie for a demon that is attached to one person to take a fancy for another person who is around them. The reason it may go from one person to the other, well the other person may be a much more vulnerable target for the demon's ultimate goal of possession. That person may be low in self esteem or a depressive, a regular drunk or drug taker. If this is the case the demon will very likely go to this other person...wow! what an opportunity for it.

Why do you ask this? have you been around someone you believe to be possessed or have a demon which is attached to them?

(05-27-2009, 09:59 AM)Paranormal Enquirer Wrote: I also want to thank you Haunting for these informative pieces of evidence...you are much appreciated. I have a question and maybe you might have an answer or just an opinion to suggest.

In regards to giving an invitation to an evil spirit, I've heard be it through my Christian background or somewhere else, that when people engage in a "sexual union" that spiritual ties can be passed through one another. Something called "soulish ties" that can transfer to another soul via sexual encounters. Soulish ties, can mean only emotional traits, bad habits, certain addiction behavior, etc. But, do you think this could also mean that a demonic entity could be passed through one another within a sexual union. I've never heard of a case like such, but I don't see why this wouldn't occur.

If one sexual encounter with a person who has an addictive personality could transfer an addictive habit through soulish ties to that other person, then surely a demon could pass to another after engaging in sex. Have you heard anything like this, or ever heard of soulish ties? Just a thought.




All my life I always wanted to be somebody. Now I see that I should have been more specific...
Reply
#25
I never thought of the whole invitation thing (through the friend), this was because I grew up with people telling me various things such as 1. If you enter your house with your left foot anything that is attached to you it immediately thrown out. 2. If you have a nail on the threshold of your door, the nail will catch the entity and keep it out as well.

Also, I liked the first post that started this thread from Haunted. It was very interesting even though I am not a Christian, as a Buddhist, I was taught that there were other ways to keep these entities out such as through talismans (just like crosses), and sutras (just like prayers). Through my life, I have seen that is works and heard about other times from my family members as well. I have to agree the statement from Haunted that there are other powers that have powers over demons.

I for one have experienced something that was almost like a demon, maybe it was I do not know. But then I didn't knew what to do (I'll share this on another thread), and if it was to happen again I know now what to do and I believe that is what the most important thing is in any paranormal situation.
[Image: 2i1zgj6.jpg]


Reply
#26
Thank you Paranormal Enquirer, I have never dealt with anything that I'd consider soulish ties. I have heard of it, but haven't done in research into it. But, since I do have the theory that anything, literally anything is possible in the paranormal world, I would say that it could be possible for a demon to transfer from one body to another in that way.

In my opinion, most cases of demonic possession have resulted in the demon being invited into the body in some way, either knowingly or unknowingly. I believe that to be demon possessed the person has to have opened a door, gave the demon the opportunity to enter them if you will. I'm not saying that they wanted to be demon possessed, I'm just saying that they provided the way.

And, since I do believe this, then I believe that soulish ties could be possible. While sex certainly isn't this way all the time, most of the time during sex you're giving all of yourself to that person, opening up to them more than any other time. You're sort of in a vulnerable state and if the person is possessed, then I don't see why the demon couldn't leave them and enter you taking advantage of this vulnerability.


Ok Buzze, I like you already, not because you agreed with some of the things I said, but because you are a fair and rational person. Most people that don't practice religions that use the bible or crosses, feel threatened and literally attack because I use those words.

I really appreciate the fact that you get the idea that you don't have to use a bible or a cross. It's so refreshing to find someone that totally understands that when I offer advice, if it has anything to do with a bible, all anyone has to do is to substitute the bible for what they believe in and have faith in.

I am not Buddhist of course, but I totally believe that talismans and sutras work just as well as a bible or a cross. It's the higher power that gives you power through these things.
Reply
#27
If you take the case of the 'exorcism of Emily Rose' as an instance to what i was saying in my last reply. Well, apparently the girl in real life, Analese (surname escapes me) was not doing anything to cause or invite a demon into her life. I think it was some attachment that was left in the halls of residence. Maybe some students (and this is very likely) had been messing with a ouija board and a demon could have attached itself to one of them, but then went on to attach itself to Analese.

There is also the cases of Francis of Assisi and Mother Thereza, i very much doubt they would have invited a demon intentionally or unintentionally.

I do admit that demon attachment is more common (from what i've researched and this is NOT on demon websites) when they are invited though.




All my life I always wanted to be somebody. Now I see that I should have been more specific...
Reply
#28
Bringing up the "Exorcism of Emily Rose" is interesting. I have had many people tell me that it was impossible for a demon to be in my husband because he believed in Christ and a demon could not enter a place where Christ existed. I realize that through drinking he perhaps left Christ and opened the door. ....But what about "Analese" if that is the name of the person depicted in this movie? She was supposed to be really strong in her Catholic Faith. The movie depicted that she truly loved God. Also, in this movie, the demons did not leave even under comandment and supposedly this was to strenghten the name of God by showing that demons are real. That by "telling her story" she would become a saint. I believe that knowing about the real existence of demons does increase one's awareness of the true essense of the spiritual realm. In my case, it has strenghtened my faith. I would just like to know others opinions on possession and belief in Christ.
"Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil." Ephesians 6:11
Reply
#29
Now I have to speak up on this. This was a complete failure of the parents, and the priest and the lack of knowledge on mental illness she was diagnosed with. Forget the book and the movie as they were made exciting to make money. The same as Amityville and The haunting in CT There are records and documentation how greedy fake demonologists used this to get famous and make money.

The Exorcism of Emily Rose is about the effects of mental illness left untreated. Emily Rose (Jennifer Carpenter) is a young woman with a complex of serious but treatable mental disorders that cause her to hallucinate, convulse, and mutilate herself. She has all medical care withheld from her on advice of her family priest, Father Moore (Tom Wilkinson), who is convinced that she is possessed by demons. Not needing much persuasion, the deeply religious family turns over the care of Emily to Father Moore. The priest subsequently tries to "exorcise" the demons, fails, and the girl dies. Put on trial for negligent homicide, the priest’s day in court, aided by a cynical lawyer (Laura Linney), is the central drama of the movie.

Only loosely based on the 1976 death of Anneliese Michel in West Germany, Emily Rose is a grinding and decidedly unscary (I yawned incessantly) theological thriller that asks moviegoers not to believe in demons as much as it asks them to doubt science. In fact, the film’s argument plays and preys on existing doubts about medical science, which, even with its great advances, so often fails us.

The real life Michel was a young woman who did not receive adequate medical treatment for her illness due mainly to backward methods used in the mid-20th century to treat epileptics and the mentally ill. She was diagnosed with epilepsy in 1968, but her treatments failed, forcing her into more destructive psychotic episodes. Because improvements in drugs designed to control epileptic seizures did not occur until later, Michel’s health worsened.
The key to healing our minds cannot be found in turning to the past, to repressive doctrine, or pseudo-scientific fads. More knowledge, more understanding, more hard science are starting points. Exchanging a for-profit health care system, for a humane one would also decisively favor real therapy.

Her parents, who had all along believed that she was under attack by demons, eventually sought the help of a priest who tried to convince his superiors to allow him to perform an exorcism. It took a year to convince the local Bishop – a serious deviation in the film says the Bishop immediately consented – who reluctantly acquiesced. The exorcisms failed and less than a year later she died in her mother’s arms, weak and emaciated from starvation and self-mutilation (on this point the film again seriously deviates, changing the story’s meaning).

The film strays from the true story, drawing it into the present and suggesting that faith in rituals and incantations had as much of a chance to save Emily as medical treatment. In fact, in order to accomplish its effort to create the faith-science dilemma, the filmmakers chose to present a distorted representation of mental illness science as simply a matter of ingesting the correct medicine. Along the way, the film depicts scientists as uncaring drug distributors who lack any real devotion to their patients, unlike the loving priest who cares deeply for Emily. As a matter of fact, he displays his devotion by ordering the girl to stop taking prescribed medicines to control the epileptic seizures that cause her mind to distort reality and hallucinate. Drugs prevent real therapy, the loving priest believes.

The film’s success, if it can be called such, lies in its convincing manipulation of the general audience’s fears of the unknown, superstitions, and lack of knowledge about mental illness.

Certainly, in our capitalist society where much medical research funding goes towards finding cures for erectile dysfunction, baldness, and enlarging our sex organs, while researchers for cures for cancer, AIDS, and other serious diseases literally have to beg for money, skepticism about the medical industry is warranted. Our society cultivates a self-concept as marred with imperfections that only expensive treatments can cure easily. Many of us rightly view this narcissistic element of some fields of medicine as a blot on the entire medical profession.


In real life, serious problems surrounding the delivery of adequate health care plague our country. In this most advanced and wealthy society, we live among 46 million people without health care coverage and 30 million more who don’t have adequate coverage. Each day about 5,000 people die from diseases that are curable or could be better treated if we exhibited the right priorities rather than the corporate drive for profit. Overwork, stress, pollutants, a corrupted food supply add their deadly thumbprints.

In addition, capitalism, as an ultra competitive system that demands a "dog eat dog" outlook to get ahead and encourages self-blame for failure, takes its toll on our psyches. Social divisions such as racism, poverty, sexism, homophobia and the like compound mental trauma. In fact, a wide range of genetic and environmental factors contribute to serious mental disease.

For these reasons, there is an epidemic of mental illness in our society. Close to 40 million people are currently being treated for some form of mental illness from mild depression to severe psychosis. The extent of the epidemic became so great in the 1980s that, instead of adequately funding Medicaid and Medicare to provided needed resources for additional treatment for many chronically ill patients, and instead of making a serious commitment to finding treatments and cures for mental illnesses, President Reagan ordered massive cuts in federal grants to mental health care facilities and funding for Medicaid and Medicare. Hundreds of thousands of mental health patients were literally forced into the streets. To cover this atrocity, right-wing ideologues went on the attack charging that the field of psychiatry was a sham and that mental illness was a scam.

The turn to religious explanations for mental illness as depicted in this fictional story are as detrimental and despicable as the fabrication pushed by Tom Cruise a couple of months ago in which he charged that mental illness is the result of the lack of vitamins and the invention of self-interested fabrications of money grubbing doctors. One hears in Father Moore's claim that Emily Rose's story is about a struggle between the forces of good and evil, the echo of Cruise's near manic and somewhat paranoid diatribe against the field of psychiatry to Matt Lauer on NBC's Today Show.

Anti-psychotic drugs, Ritalin, therapy, and the (misunderstood) barbarism of electro-shock treatments are the real cause of human dysfunction, shouts this lunatic fringe. Prayer, vitamins, a good life and lifestyle are the cures. The tragedy is that Anneliese Michel isn’t the only victim of this mindset.

The key to healing our minds cannot be found in turning to the past, to repressive doctrine, or pseudo-scientific fads. More knowledge, more understanding, more hard science are starting points. Exchanging a for-profit health care system, for a humane one would also decisively favor real therapy.
Belief bias occurs when we make illogical conclusions in order to confirm our preexisting beliefs. Belief perseverance refers to our tendency to maintain a belief even after the evidence we used to form the belief is contradicted.
Reply
#30
Yes, UglyNRude, she did have several problems that were not treated in the right way. I guess because at the time there wasn't enough known about some of them. Thankfully, science and the psychiatric field has came a lot further since then and is more able to make correct diagnoisis' and treat more types of mental illness.

The problem with Christians is that most of them think that just because they're Christians they're not going to have to deal with demons and such. Think of it this way, if you are living in sin and doing the devils work, then why would he need to torment you or possess you? Of course, i'm not say that things like this doesn't happen to sinners, but being a Chsristian don't exclude you from it.

I do not believe that all cases of possession are due to a person inviting them in. I'm sure that very few people have actually wanted to be possessed. I don't mean invited in the literal sense, sometimes you can cause this to happen just by putting yourself in the wrong situation, associating with the wrong people etc.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)






About Talk Paranormal Forum

...

              Quick Links

              User Links

             ...

  • ...
  • ...
  • ...
  • ...