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SCOTS MYTHS
#1
Scotland's history is littered with tales of myth and legend capable of firing the imagination and chilling the bone.

LOCH KATRINE, PERTHSHIRE

In ancient times, Ben Venue was said to be home to a sacred spring that was guarded by people who lived there. When it was being looked after by a girl called Katrine, a cave-dwelling demon - their only enemy - pounced. The demon drugged her with mountain berries before he released all the sluices of the well, allowing the water to pour down the valley and drown the sleeping villagers. When Katrine woke and saw what had happened, she threw herself into the Loch in despair, giving it her name.

KELPIES AND WATER-HORSES

The beasts said to haunt Scotland's waters are sometimes confused for each other but both entice people to a watery doom, usually by appearing as a beautiful, playful horse with deadly intentions. One story from Glen Keltney in Perthshire tells of seven little girls enticed to get on the back of a horse grazing by the water's edge - only to be thrown into the Loch. Only their entrails were to be seen again.....

SAWNEY BEAN THE CANNIBAL, AYRSHIRE

SAWNEY and his wife reputedly lived with their children and grandchildren in a cave where they survived by luring travellers, robbing them, killing them and eating their flesh.. 'Sawney' was also used as a derogatory term for Scots in England and the tale could have been used as an anti-scottish scare story. The yarn has influenced much modern day culture, not least the film 'Ravenous', which starred Robert Carlyle.

THE LOCH NESS MONSTER

The eerie sight of the mythical creature poking her long neck out of the water is a relatively modern phenomenon, with the first reports coming from 1933 and the first phtograph - later revealed to be fake - dating from 1934.
But there have been tales of creatures in the Loch from long before then. In the seventh century, St Columba's biographer, Adomnan, told how the saint came across the burial of a man who had been killed by a 'water-beastie', which lurked in the River Ness.
And when one of St. Columba's monks entered the water to collect a boat so their party could cross, the creature came after him with gaping jaws. But St. Columba defeated it with the power of prayer, making the sign of the cross and ordering the terrifying creature to return to its lair.

THE THISTLE OF SCOTLAND

The reason the thistle became the national symbol of Scotland is open to question, but one of the best stories involves the Danish Army invading the Highlands in the 11th century. The Danes tried to take the Scots by surprise by taking off their boots and sneaking up on them barefoot. But they came unstuck when they walked over a field of thistles and their screams gave away their position.

THE CAILLEACH, HIGHLAND & ISLANDS

She was a giantess who made Scotland from rock she brought from Norway. When she raised a foot to cross the sea she dropped some pebbles and formed The Hebridies. Another dropped and formed Ailsa Craig. She was also the subject of an eerie ritual when a farmer would make a straw doll of her after cutting his corn and pass it on to his neighbour.


I hope you enjoyed these wee stories i got from my daily paper.[/b]
Heaven doesn't want me, and Hell's afraid i'll take over
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#2
Thank you for sharing these, dizziayr! Of course, I have heard of the Loch Ness Monster, and I remember hearing that "Ravenous" was based on Scottish folklore.....the rest were a new read for me.

(I'll wager the Danes haven't walked barefoot since!)
“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” ~Philip K. Dick

http://paranormalinreview2.zohosites.com/home.html

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#3
Thanks for this info dizziar, i hadn't heard of alot of it.

You are lucky to live in Scotland, i have been there about 5 times in my life and it has a really spooky feel about it in the highlands and inverness where my brother used to live. He was stationed up at Glasgow when he was in the navy. We drove around loch ness and it was all misty...wow!

I've been to Aberdeen, Stranraer which i love, toured the highlands with my parents when i was a teenager...wonderful, and around the Inverness area and Glasgow. Where abouts in Scotland do you live?




All my life I always wanted to be somebody. Now I see that I should have been more specific...
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#4
wow thank you for those stories. when i was i high school i uesed to read a lot of myths and legends
Even though you are in darkness, there will always be a light to guide your path.Blue Cat
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#5
That was totally well worth reading I love things like this and thanks again for the share
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#6
Eyepriestess, i live in Ayr, southwest Scotland, from our beach we can see Arran, the Mull of Kintyre and Aisla Craig, its stunning. When thd boys were wee and we took them down the beach to blow off some energy they loved it, alot of the time you cant see Arran so, we used to say 'Oh look somebody stole Arran', now when we go down to the beach, they all say it to me lol.

Theres a saying in Ayr, 'If you cant see Arran its raining and if you can see Arran, its going to rain!!'

Glad yous enjoyed these wee stories, i dont know much about the myths and legends, but i love learning about them.
Heaven doesn't want me, and Hell's afraid i'll take over
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#7
These were wonderful! Thank you so much! Smile
"It is not length of life, but depth of life." -Ralph Waldo Emerson

Dragon wizard <--BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR.. it may not always be what you need..

Free your mind and the rest will follow....
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#8
Being Scottish on my mother's and father's side of the family, I always find it interesting to read about the mythology of Scotland. About half my library is taken up with the myths of Scotland and Scottish history. "Scotland the Brave" and St.Andrews Cross, white on a field of blue.
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#9
(11-06-2009, 03:17 PM)Graveyard Hound Wrote: Being Scottish on my mother's and father's side of the family, I always find it interesting to read about the mythology of Scotland. About half my library is taken up with the myths of Scotland and Scottish history. "Scotland the Brave" and St.Andrews Cross, white on a field of blue.
That's great...do you have anything you would like to add to the mythology? I'm interested in reading about them..it's very facinating to me..Icontexto-emoticons-07-032x032
"It is not length of life, but depth of life." -Ralph Waldo Emerson

Dragon wizard <--BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR.. it may not always be what you need..

Free your mind and the rest will follow....
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#10
(10-07-2009, 02:22 AM)dizziayr Wrote: Eyepriestess, i live in Ayr, southwest Scotland, from our beach we can see Arran, the Mull of Kintyre and Aisla Craig, its stunning. When thd boys were wee and we took them down the beach to blow off some energy they loved it, alot of the time you cant see Arran so, we used to say 'Oh look somebody stole Arran', now when we go down to the beach, they all say it to me lol.

Theres a saying in Ayr, 'If you cant see Arran its raining and if you can see Arran, its going to rain!!'

Glad yous enjoyed these wee stories, i dont know much about the myths and legends, but i love learning about them.

You're making me feel homesick with this post.
I'm originally from Inverkip, but moved away to Nottingham about 10 years ago.
I have vivid memories of school trips & weekend trips to Rabbie Burns cottage & Brig O Doon!
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