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SCOTS MYTHS
#11
We are Scottish too. My family comes from Stranraer and Glasgow. The family came across the pond the the 1860's. They settled in Nebraska. My children took Scottish dancing lessons and my son got a Bronze Madal for it. I wanted them to take up the Pipes, but lessons were beyond my reach and I couldn't be sure that they would stay with it. When we can, we go to the St. Andrew's Highland Games. I'd love to one day go to the Grandfaher Mountain Games in South Carolina, here in the US in June. In the US we have a magazine called the Highlander, if anyone is interested. It covers all things Scottish, here and in Scotland.
I love all the movies of Scotland, one of my favorites is the "Water Horse". Of course I can't leave out the BBC's series of " Monarch of the Glen " !! For those of you that haven't seen it in the US, it's really good, the Scottish scenery is just beautiful. It's like being there yourself.

Dizziayr , Have you gone to , oh gads,what's called... Kings Mary Close ? How about Greyfriars Covenant cemetery ? Forgive me , please, they have been on the SyFy channel , Scariest Places , I think. Are they as bad as theynare discribed on the tv ? Or is just for show and ratings ?
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#12
Being of Scottish ancestory, from the Orkkney Islands, I always am interested in anything related to its history, mythology, legends, and myths. Sometime the lines between the history part and legend part can get very fuzzy.
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#13
My family is from Ayrshire, I was raised in Scottish tales and myths and legends and folklore from my entire family.
Good to see more Scots hereSmile.
"It's guid to be merry and wise,
It's guid to be honest and true,
It's guid to support Caledonia's cause
And bide by the buff and the blue."
Sir,Robert Burns
“Protected by Witchcraft"
[Image: 292o5rq.gif] Member of the Black Hat Society
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#14
Scottish, Graham clan, Pebbles and Edinburgh, but I am born in the USA. Our family's high Sensitivity goes back to my grandmother, who I knew well, and traces down the female side to my daughter. I am sure that it goes much farther back.

Thanks for the tales!
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#15
Pumpkin_16 
(11-06-2009, 03:17 PM)Graveyard Hound Wrote: Being Scottish on my mother's and father's side of the family, I always find it interesting to read about the mythology of Scotland. About half my library is taken up with the myths of Scotland and Scottish history. "Scotland the Brave" and St.Andrews Cross, white on a field of blue.

Thanks for sharing. just wanted to check back to see if anymore had been added since I last read it. Looking for more. Thanks.Rednose
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#16
Great stories, I loved reading them. And I believe that kelpie myth was used by J.K Rowling in HP or in some further literature related to it.
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#17
Check out the work of Affleck Gray who gathered a lot of Cairngorm folklore, it's amazing how deep and rich are the tales to come out of that part of the world.

Legends of the Cairngorms focuses on a plethora of accounts, whereas The Big Grey Man of Ben Macdui looks particularly at the Fear Liath Mor, which is simply the spookiest mountain I've ever heard of.

What's terrific about these legends is they're pretty incomparable to anything else from the rest of the UK or around the world, which suggests that the Highlands are quite a unique place atmospherically.
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#18
Goodness, I AM Scottish and live in Glasgow and I've only heard of the Kelpies, The Thistle story about the Danes and well of course Nessie. Ugh, I HATE that stupid legend about Loch Ness monster. Load of crap lol.
I felt sort of guilty for not knowing as much about my country's legends so I did a little research and found some more things if anyone is interested in reading them Smile

Selkies:

Selkies were mythical creatures that could transform themselves from seal to human form and back again. The legend of the selkie apparently originated on the Orkney and Shetland Islands where selch or selk(ie) is the Scots word for seal.

Tales once abounded of a man who found a beautiful female selkie sunbathing on a beach, stole her skin and forced her to become his wife and bear his children, only for her to find the skin years later and escape back to seal form and the sea.

Robert the Bruce and the Spider:

Robert the Bruce became King of Scotland in 1306. Edward I of England took immediate action, forcing him into hiding. According to legend, at some point while he was on the run and when he was at his lowest ebb, Bruce hid himself in a cave. There, he watched a spider spinning a web from one part of the cave to the other. Watching the spider try and try again to build her web before succeeding is said to have inspired Bruce to carry on fighting the English. He did so, and after the death of Edward I in 1307, Bruce defeated Edward II's armies at Bannockburn in 1314.

There are a number of caves in South West Scotland that claim to be the one where Bruce watched the spider. No one is certain which is the authentic cave or even if the incident with the spider ever really happened.

Wulver:

A werewolf in Shetland, that is said to have had the body of a man with a wolf’s head. It was reported to have left fish on the windowsills of poor families.

Blue Men of Minch:

Blue-skinned men who lived in the water between Lewis and mainland Scotland, looking for sailors to drown and boats to sink.

Bean-Nighe:

Scottish Gaelic for ‘washer woman’, is a Scottish fairy seen as an omen of death. It is said she could be found by streams and pools washing the clothes of those who are about to die.

Thomas of Ercildoune:

He was also known as Thomas the Rhymer, born 700 years ago in the Lowlands of Scotland. He recorded his prophecies in rhymes, as did Nostradamus centuries later.
One of his rhymes was
"Tide, tide, whate'er betide,
There'll aye be Haigs at Bemersyde"
There was an important family called Haig at the place called Bemersyde, on the border with England for many centuries until the line died out in the 19th Century. It seemed as though Thomas had been wrong, until the nation presented Bemersyde to Earl Haig (World War I leader) who was related to the original Haigs.
Another prophecy that may be ascribed to Thomas concerns the union of the crowns of Scotland and England in 1603, and Merlin's grave in Scotland.

The Brahan Seer:

Kenneth the Sallow (Coinneach Odhar) was born 300 years ago in the Highlands of Scotland. He was gifted with "the sight" - an ability to see visions that came unbidden day or night. His prophecies were so impressive that he is still quoted to this day.

Some of his prophetic visions that have actually come true in the years following his death include:

1. The battle of Culloden (1745), which he uttered at the site, and his words were recorded. "This bleak moor, ere many generations have passed, shall be stained with the best blood in Scotland. Glad I am that I will not see that day."
2. The joining of the lochs in the Great Glen = accomplished by the construction of the Caledonian Canal in the 19th Century.
3. Pointing to a field far from seashore, loch or river, he said that a ship would anchor there one day. The canal did not come near the spot, so folk decided this prophecy must be incorrect until one day in the 1930s an Airship did indeed tie up there.
4. The most impressive of his prophecies concerned the doom of the Mackenzies of Seaforth. You can read about this in the book "Scottish Lore and Folklore" by Ronald Douglas.

Prophecies still waiting to happen:

We are still waiting for these

1. "One day a black rain will fall on the City of Aberdeen". Optimists hope this refers to the North Sea Oil Fields and the big business it has brought to Aberdeen. Pessimists fear it predicts Nuclear War.
2. "Rome was; London is; Edinburgh will be." This seems to imply that the Scottish Capital City will someday become more important than the British Capital of London.

King Arthur:

Despite claims to the contrary, there is a lot of evidence that King Arthur and most of the knights of the Round Table were Scottish. And what was that Questing Beast that Sir Pellinore spent years pursuing - could it be the Loch Ness Monster? Was Arthur the son of King Aidan?

Halloween:

Americans think they invented it. Certainly, they commercialized the hell out of it, and pushed down our throats. What used to be a quaint and charming way of getting pocket money to buy fireworks for the 5th of November has turned into a mass-marketing of bite-sized snickers bars. But back hundreds of years ago, in Scotland there was no street lighting, and nothing to light your way home in the countryside when it got dark at 4 pm on the cold afternoon of October 31st. People were scared of the ghosts, witches, and evil spirits that rose from their graves, or hell, to wander abroad on the eve of All Hallows (November 1st - you know - Disney showed it in the scary bit near the end of Fantasia). So folk decided it might be possible to escape the notice of these evil beings if they dressed up like a ghost or a witch themselves on Halloween. That's where the tradition came from - wear a disguise so the ghouls will think you're one of them, and you'll get home safely on Halloween.
Later, with the Victorian era, a bit of gas lighting in the streets, a bit of scientific education and enlightenment, people pretended that they didn't believe in witches, ghosts and evil spirits anymore, and the custom was donated to children. It became a fun night, and kids were encouraged to dress up, go round to their neighbours houses, and do "a turn" or a party-piece to amuse the adults. This was called "guising" from the word disguise. In return, the kids were given a treat or some money. Party games such as ducking for apples were laid on as well. There was never any "tricking". You only got a treat if you did your turn first, by singing a song, playing a tune on a mouthorgan or recited a poem.

Black Donald: The devil who cannot disguise his cloven feet.

Brownie: Good-natured, invisible brown elves or household goblins. The younger version of the "Girl Guides" in Britain at least, are called "Brownies" for that very reason!

Clootie: Another Scottish name for the Devil. The name comes from cloot, meaning one division of a cleft hoof.

Ghillie Dhu: A Solitary Scottish Elf.

Red Cap: Lives on the Scottish border in ancient ruins and castles.

Scotia: A Goddess but frequently portrayed as an old hag.

Shellycoat: A Scottish Bogeyman who haunts the rivers and streams. He is covered with shells which rattle when he moves.

Sidhe: The Gaelic name for fairies in both Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland.
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#19
(05-19-2015, 07:28 AM)truthfinder Wrote: Goodness, I AM Scottish and live in Glasgow and I've only heard of the Kelpies, The Thistle story about the Danes and well of course Nessie. Ugh, I HATE that stupid legend about Loch Ness monster. Load of crap lol.
I felt sort of guilty for not knowing as much about my country's legends so I did a little research and found some more things if anyone is interested in reading them Smile

Selkies:

Selkies were mythical creatures that could transform themselves from seal to human form and back again. The legend of the selkie apparently originated on the Orkney and Shetland Islands where selch or selk(ie) is the Scots word for seal.

Tales once abounded of a man who found a beautiful female selkie sunbathing on a beach, stole her skin and forced her to become his wife and bear his children, only for her to find the skin years later and escape back to seal form and the sea.

Robert the Bruce and the Spider:

Robert the Bruce became King of Scotland in 1306. Edward I of England took immediate action, forcing him into hiding. According to legend, at some point while he was on the run and when he was at his lowest ebb, Bruce hid himself in a cave. There, he watched a spider spinning a web from one part of the cave to the other. Watching the spider try and try again to build her web before succeeding is said to have inspired Bruce to carry on fighting the English. He did so, and after the death of Edward I in 1307, Bruce defeated Edward II's armies at Bannockburn in 1314.

There are a number of caves in South West Scotland that claim to be the one where Bruce watched the spider. No one is certain which is the authentic cave or even if the incident with the spider ever really happened.

Wulver:

A werewolf in Shetland, that is said to have had the body of a man with a wolf’s head. It was reported to have left fish on the windowsills of poor families.

Blue Men of Minch:

Blue-skinned men who lived in the water between Lewis and mainland Scotland, looking for sailors to drown and boats to sink.

Bean-Nighe:

Scottish Gaelic for ‘washer woman’, is a Scottish fairy seen as an omen of death. It is said she could be found by streams and pools washing the clothes of those who are about to die.

Thomas of Ercildoune:

He was also known as Thomas the Rhymer, born 700 years ago in the Lowlands of Scotland. He recorded his prophecies in rhymes, as did Nostradamus centuries later.
One of his rhymes was
"Tide, tide, whate'er betide,
There'll aye be Haigs at Bemersyde"
There was an important family called Haig at the place called Bemersyde, on the border with England for many centuries until the line died out in the 19th Century. It seemed as though Thomas had been wrong, until the nation presented Bemersyde to Earl Haig (World War I leader) who was related to the original Haigs.
Another prophecy that may be ascribed to Thomas concerns the union of the crowns of Scotland and England in 1603, and Merlin's grave in Scotland.

The Brahan Seer:

Kenneth the Sallow (Coinneach Odhar) was born 300 years ago in the Highlands of Scotland. He was gifted with "the sight" - an ability to see visions that came unbidden day or night. His prophecies were so impressive that he is still quoted to this day.

Some of his prophetic visions that have actually come true in the years following his death include:

1. The battle of Culloden (1745), which he uttered at the site, and his words were recorded. "This bleak moor, ere many generations have passed, shall be stained with the best blood in Scotland. Glad I am that I will not see that day."
2. The joining of the lochs in the Great Glen = accomplished by the construction of the Caledonian Canal in the 19th Century.
3. Pointing to a field far from seashore, loch or river, he said that a ship would anchor there one day. The canal did not come near the spot, so folk decided this prophecy must be incorrect until one day in the 1930s an Airship did indeed tie up there.
4. The most impressive of his prophecies concerned the doom of the Mackenzies of Seaforth. You can read about this in the book "Scottish Lore and Folklore" by Ronald Douglas.

Prophecies still waiting to happen:

We are still waiting for these

1. "One day a black rain will fall on the City of Aberdeen". Optimists hope this refers to the North Sea Oil Fields and the big business it has brought to Aberdeen. Pessimists fear it predicts Nuclear War.
2. "Rome was; London is; Edinburgh will be." This seems to imply that the Scottish Capital City will someday become more important than the British Capital of London.

King Arthur:

Despite claims to the contrary, there is a lot of evidence that King Arthur and most of the knights of the Round Table were Scottish. And what was that Questing Beast that Sir Pellinore spent years pursuing - could it be the Loch Ness Monster? Was Arthur the son of King Aidan?

Halloween:

Americans think they invented it. Certainly, they commercialized the hell out of it, and pushed down our throats. What used to be a quaint and charming way of getting pocket money to buy fireworks for the 5th of November has turned into a mass-marketing of bite-sized snickers bars. But back hundreds of years ago, in Scotland there was no street lighting, and nothing to light your way home in the countryside when it got dark at 4 pm on the cold afternoon of October 31st. People were scared of the ghosts, witches, and evil spirits that rose from their graves, or hell, to wander abroad on the eve of All Hallows (November 1st - you know - Disney showed it in the scary bit near the end of Fantasia). So folk decided it might be possible to escape the notice of these evil beings if they dressed up like a ghost or a witch themselves on Halloween. That's where the tradition came from - wear a disguise so the ghouls will think you're one of them, and you'll get home safely on Halloween.
Later, with the Victorian era, a bit of gas lighting in the streets, a bit of scientific education and enlightenment, people pretended that they didn't believe in witches, ghosts and evil spirits anymore, and the custom was donated to children. It became a fun night, and kids were encouraged to dress up, go round to their neighbours houses, and do "a turn" or a party-piece to amuse the adults. This was called "guising" from the word disguise. In return, the kids were given a treat or some money. Party games such as ducking for apples were laid on as well. There was never any "tricking". You only got a treat if you did your turn first, by singing a song, playing a tune on a mouthorgan or recited a poem.

Black Donald: The devil who cannot disguise his cloven feet.

Brownie: Good-natured, invisible brown elves or household goblins. The younger version of the "Girl Guides" in Britain at least, are called "Brownies" for that very reason!

Clootie: Another Scottish name for the Devil. The name comes from cloot, meaning one division of a cleft hoof.

Ghillie Dhu: A Solitary Scottish Elf.

Red Cap: Lives on the Scottish border in ancient ruins and castles.

Scotia: A Goddess but frequently portrayed as an old hag.

Shellycoat: A Scottish Bogeyman who haunts the rivers and streams. He is covered with shells which rattle when he moves.

Sidhe: The Gaelic name for fairies in both Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland.
You will remember George Mccluskey then Truthfinder.
He was made to play for Celtic
And he captained the reserves at Leeds

Now he was my hero when i was a teenager.

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#20
GypsyLaneSpirits

I have no interest in football, especially Scottish football. So no idea what you're talking about...
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