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Make your haunted location stand out
#1
Not capturing enough evidence at your haunted building?
People just not making you rich?
Well do what others are doing, hire a professional team to bring in all kinds of options to make your guests capture what they think is paranormal. From hot and cold spots to causing your guests to feel sick, they can do it all.

Dear ghost hunters and paranormal investigators,

Better brush up on your critical thinking and magic skills, because professional FX are available for a fee...and according to an interview with owner ..it seems he's set up professional hoaxes in about two dozen locations.

And the frauds and hoaxes continue to grow.
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#2
This is one major reason why I like to research the history of a supposed haunted buildings before considering the possibility it's really haunted. It helps differentiate between fact and hoax.... at least in one sense.
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#3
OP, I was curious why you didn't include a link. A quick google search reveals the answer:
[quote, a company that specializes in building movie prop replicas, haunted house attractions, and realistic animatronics to name a few things. http://weekinweird.com/2016/09/14/specia...s-booming/[/quote]
Do you really believe that investigators are going to be fooled by haunted house effects?
(09-16-2016, 01:43 AM)jadewik Wrote: This is one major reason why I like to research the history of a supposed haunted buildings before considering the possibility it's really haunted. It helps differentiate between fact and hoax.... at least in one sense.
What's the point of research? No place on Earth has been proven to be haunted. Even if a place is supposedly haunted what is stopping people like him from using effects for hoaxes?
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#4
Paranormal investigators are fooled all the time, from poor photography to cell phone ghost apps. Hell a flashing flashlight is seen as a ghost communicating, spiking emf and rf are seen as ghosts to so many paranormal teams who do not understand the equipment they use. The wonderful K2 is seen by so many as a communication device as they were taught that by TV, just yesterday a paranormal team posted a picture of the ring girl. So special effects fool them? Yes
The reason I didn't post a link was i wasn't going to advertise for them
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#5
I would say it's highly unlikely for even a very poor and gullible investigator to be fooled by haunted house effects. The problem arises from revenue investigators who operate for profit and take any subtle indication as a haunting strictly for the entertainment purpose of the audience. You haven't cited any links but I'd say it's likely what you mentioned comes from some type of entertainment based investigators. Even your main point of increased frauds is based on this persons claim of creating two dozen hoaxes. The purpose of his claim to increase profit. Why are you taking so much stock in profit based claims?
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#6
I'm a little confused, Netr9. On one hand, you're asking UNR to cite links, but on the other hand you denounce the purpose of research. Can you please make up your mind? Are you looking for facts yourself, or just a bunch of hullabaloo?

More to the point of my first posting in this thread-- since I feel the need to explain the intent of my post-- if a place is purported to be haunted, there would likely be some sort of story behind the alleged ghosts. I didn't infer that the haunting would be a credible "holy-cow it's a ghost" actual haunting at that point-- I merely insinuated that if a house has a story based in actual fact that it would be a better place to conduct an investigation than some random shack that people just talk about as being haunted.

As for UNR's evidence, I'd like to cite all the fakes and frauds Houdini debunked like Mina Crandon. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was fooled by Crandon.... how about Uri Geller? The Cottingly Faeries? Kamala and Amala? Amityville? Gee-Wiz, could it be that historical research actually does help debunk hoaxes? Hmmm. I think it does. If people can be fooled by a few props or acting, that's sufficient evidence, one would think, that with today's technological advances-- including the fear frequency (infrasound), often employed by spook alleys around Halloween-- that UNR's hypothesis that a gullible investigator can, in fact, be duped by haunted house effects is correct.
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#7
(09-23-2016, 10:01 PM)jadewik Wrote: I'm a little confused, Netr9. On one hand, you're asking UNR to cite links, but on the other hand you denounce the purpose of research. Can you please make up your mind? Are you looking for facts yourself, or just a bunch of hullabaloo?
I believe in the paranormal yet I understand it cannot be proven. How do you intend seek evidence to do research in a field that is completely unproven? Now the big difference, it is completely proven that there are entertainment paranormal investigators. They can be fully researched and their results need to be omitted. There is good reason to ask for the links of investigators who are so easily fooled because they tend to do it for ratings.
Quote:More to the point of my first posting in this thread-- since I feel the need to explain the intent of my post-- if a place is purported to be haunted, there would likely be some sort of story behind the alleged ghosts. I didn't infer that the haunting would be a credible "holy-cow it's a ghost" actual haunting at that point-- I merely insinuated that if a house has a story based in actual fact that it would be a better place to conduct an investigation than some random shack that people just talk about as being haunted.
All of this fall under profit. It's good for business to make up stories because it draws in tourists. A random shack could be extremely haunted but it would be a difficult draw in people compared to a large mansion.
Quote: UNR's hypothesis that a gullible investigator can, in fact, be duped by haunted house effects is correct.
Why believe the claim of the person who doing it for the benefit of personal gain?


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#8
(09-24-2016, 04:50 PM)Netr9 Wrote: Why believe the claim of the person who doing it for the benefit of personal gain?

Why indeed?
-DFB

Subject: I have a black cat.
Believer: Black cats are bad luck.
Non-believer: It's just a cat.
Crackpot: Black cats are part of the New World Order government conspiracy.
Skeptic: I can test if black cats are more or less lucky than another cat.
Cynic: You only have a black cat to gain power and prestige.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9iIf4tFoyE

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#9
I don't intend to seek evidence of haunting. I seek the more telling history... and I do love a good story.

There seems to be a consensus that, given the current scientific method, it is not possible to confirm the paranormal exists. I'd like to point out that just because current scientific method cannot prove something exists at this time, doesn't prove beyond a doubt that something doesn't exist either. This is typically the error that most skeptics make--- the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy-- when "proving" paranormal doesn't exist. Just because something cannot be proven doesn't mean it doesn't exist... afterall, yesterday's "witchcraft" is today's "modern medicine" (among other things).

I also disagree with your points on profit being the sole motivation behind paranormal places popping up. Stating that profit is the only motivational factor indicates that anyone who has anything to do with paranormal is out to make a quick buck. Do you intend to say that anyone sharing a personal experience is out to make money? That we're all here to make money?

I think there's a much larger picture at hand and it has a lot to do with history. As was in the day's of Houdini, spiritualism is regaining some status in popular culture. Now, as then, many people are quick to believe what they can't explain because they saw or experienced something inexplicable. Perhaps things started out as something with pure intent... but it's hard to keep something pure when there are those who would pollute it.

Seems quite sad to me that you believe everyone is only out to make a quick buck... I would hate to live in your world. It's so limiting. Why bother trying anything. It's all been done. There's no progression. No questioning anything. No scientific discoveries. No answers. Blegh. How depressing.

I'm afraid I'm going to have to disagree. I rather enjoy questions and seeking answers-- even if the answer is frequently "who knows?"...
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#10
(09-24-2016, 10:22 PM)jadewik Wrote: I don't intend to seek evidence of haunting. I seek the more telling history... and I do love a good story.
That's quite a contrast from the reason you gave earlier:
(09-16-2016, 01:43 AM)jadewik Wrote: This is one major reason why I like to research the history of a supposed haunted buildings before considering the possibility it's really haunted.
All structures with some history are bound to have numerous good, sad and interesting stories etched into their walls. Yet most are certainly not going be considered haunted.
Quote:There seems to be a consensus that, given the current scientific method, it is not possible to confirm the paranormal exists. I'd like to point out that just because current scientific method cannot prove something exists at this time, doesn't prove beyond a doubt that something doesn't exist either. This is typically the error that most skeptics make--- the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy-- when "proving" paranormal doesn't exist. Just because something cannot be proven doesn't mean it doesn't exist... afterall, yesterday's "witchcraft" is today's "modern medicine" (among other things).
I agree with most of this, but I'm not a skeptic towards ghosts. I cannot say if the phenomenon is actually
deceased humans but a phenomenon definitely exists.
Quote:I also disagree with your points on profit being the sole motivation behind paranormal places popping up. Stating that profit is the only motivational factor indicates that anyone who has anything to do with paranormal is out to make a quick buck. Do you intend to say that anyone sharing a personal experience is out to make money? That we're all here to make money?
Most people sharing an experience are not out for profit. I would wager that most people who come to this site are simply sharing an experience to try to get a better understanding, a skeptic or someone in between. That's all fine. The problem comes when the only motivation is money. There are several Victorian houses in my neighborhood that advertise as being haunted. I know people who took the paid toured many times and experience nothing. Maybe they are haunted or maybe it's a money draw, you decide. My biggest issue is with shows like taps and various youtube paranormal channels which must entertain or lose viewership. I'm highly skeptical of the entertainment investigators.
Quote:Seems quite sad to me that you believe everyone is only out to make a quick buck... I would hate to live in your world. It's so limiting. Why bother trying anything. It's all been done. There's no progression. No questioning anything. No scientific discoveries. No answers. Blegh. How depressing.
Good grief. Yes, I'm very dubious of any evidence from those who seek a profit. I question everything. That's because I only rely on my own direct evidence. I've tested different techniques and made innovations. I collected interesting phenomenon that defy known physics.




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