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Paranormal Beliefs and Cognitive ProcessesUnderlying the Formation of Delusions
#11
I didn't assume that no one read it. I asked if anyone did. And millions of people can believe a delusional thought. It doesn't make it any less delusional. But thanks for providing some actual commentary into the study itself. Whether the findings are agreed with or not, there is a lot to be learned from the work that has been done to identify what people experience and why.
“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” ~Philip K. Dick

http://paranormalinreview2.zohosites.com/home.html

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#12
(07-20-2014, 07:38 PM)scarygirl67 Wrote: I didn't assume that no one read it. I asked if anyone did. And millions of people can believe a delusional thought. It doesn't make it any less delusional. But thanks for providing some actual commentary into the study itself. Whether the findings are agreed with or not, there is a lot to be learned from the work that has been done to identify what people experience and why.

That's exactly my point. Their argument is ad populum. A logical fallacy. They just don't want to go there because religious beliefs are so prevalent that people would get upset about that. It's perfectly fine to pigeon-hole folks who believe in ghosts, though, because they're obviously wackos. (sarcasm)

The bottom line is that stuff happens that we can't explain yet. People aren't being considered delusional and in need of mental health services because they think they have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Why would there be such a focus on people who believe they have experienced the paranormal? Answer...they're easier targets, and scientists don't like the paranormal. If the social climate was just slightly different, they'd be going after every single person who believes in religion, as well, and trying to put them on meds.

The thing is, people have the freedom to think for themselves. They are not required to be hardcore skeptic atheists in order to be considered sane and not needing psychiatric drugs.
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#13
And once again, you make a lot of assumptions about scientists and about skeptic's suggestions. Yes we are ALL free to share our thoughts, experiences, and opinions. There are a couple of people here who question some of the claims or have disagreements with some of the members. So what? If we all agreed on everything, it would make for boring discussions.

Another interesting study done about the misattribution hypothesis in regards to psychic ability. And please, let me stress, it says "hypothesis". Not "definitive answer".

http://www.koestler-parapsychology.psy.e...proofs.pdf
“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” ~Philip K. Dick

http://paranormalinreview2.zohosites.com/home.html

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#14
(07-21-2014, 10:20 AM)scarygirl67 Wrote: And once again, you make a lot of assumptions about scientists and about skeptic's suggestions. Yes we are ALL free to share our thoughts, experiences, and opinions. There are a couple of people here who question some of the claims or have disagreements with some of the members. So what? If we all agreed on everything, it would make for boring discussions.

Another interesting study done about the misattribution hypothesis in regards to psychic ability. And please, let me stress, it says "hypothesis". Not "definitive answer".

http://www.koestler-parapsychology.psy.e...proofs.pdf

It's fine if people want to be skeptical, but the bottom line is that scientists attempt to pathologize people who don't agree with everything they say. When people are pathologized in this manner, then doctors try to medicate them. Is it your belief that every religious person in the world needs to be medicated? That's where this can go. You realize that, right?

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#15
I have to ask why you are hung up on the medication thing? Many people who have had hallucinations or delusional thoughts are completely normal. A few misfires or crossed transmitters of the brain do not call for medication. Hmmm are you on medications? or have you been told you need them?
Belief bias occurs when we make illogical conclusions in order to confirm our preexisting beliefs. Belief perseverance refers to our tendency to maintain a belief even after the evidence we used to form the belief is contradicted.
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#16
(07-21-2014, 10:48 AM)UglyNRude Wrote: I have to ask why you are hung up on the medication thing? Many people who have had hallucinations or delusional thoughts are completely normal. A few misfires or crossed transmitters of the brain do not call for medication. Hmmm are you on medications? or have you been told you need them?

No. I just know that if anyone goes to a doc and says doc I'm hearing voices, a doc will put that person on meds...never considering that they could actually be hearing real voices.

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#17
(07-21-2014, 11:02 AM)ChaosRose Wrote:
(07-21-2014, 10:48 AM)UglyNRude Wrote: I have to ask why you are hung up on the medication thing? Many people who have had hallucinations or delusional thoughts are completely normal. A few misfires or crossed transmitters of the brain do not call for medication. Hmmm are you on medications? or have you been told you need them?

No. I just know that if anyone goes to a doc and says doc I'm hearing voices, a doc will put that person on meds...never considering that they could actually be hearing real voices.

I would think any good doctor would look deeper before writing meds, and even may suggest testing. MRI's sleep deprived eeg's. Are there bad doctors sure but a person wanting answers should seek out a good one.
Belief bias occurs when we make illogical conclusions in order to confirm our preexisting beliefs. Belief perseverance refers to our tendency to maintain a belief even after the evidence we used to form the belief is contradicted.
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#18
(07-21-2014, 11:11 AM)UglyNRude Wrote:
(07-21-2014, 11:02 AM)ChaosRose Wrote:
(07-21-2014, 10:48 AM)UglyNRude Wrote: I have to ask why you are hung up on the medication thing? Many people who have had hallucinations or delusional thoughts are completely normal. A few misfires or crossed transmitters of the brain do not call for medication. Hmmm are you on medications? or have you been told you need them?

No. I just know that if anyone goes to a doc and says doc I'm hearing voices, a doc will put that person on meds...never considering that they could actually be hearing real voices.

I would think any good doctor would look deeper before writing meds, and even may suggest testing. MRI's sleep deprived eeg's. Are there bad doctors sure but a person wanting answers should seek out a good one.

One thing I doubt a doc would ever consider is the possibility that the phenomena a person has experienced is real. And you're right, they would probably hit them with a barrage of tests...which can be rather expensive. Some of them might even be painful. At the end of it, if they found nothing, they would have to conclude that it was all psychological. So the deck is clearly stacked against anyone who has experienced something weird.
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