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The ghostly radio station that no one claims to run - Kayt - 08-03-2017

I know this is not paranormal, but I did think it may interest some here.

Quote:MDZhB has been broadcasting since 1982. No one knows why.

In the middle of a Russian swampland, not far from the city of St Petersburg, is a rectangular iron gate. Beyond its rusted bars is a collection of radio towers, abandoned buildings and power lines bordered by a dry-stone wall. This sinister location is the focus of a mystery which stretches back to the height of the Cold War.

It is thought to be the headquarters of a radio station, “MDZhB”, that no-one has ever claimed to run. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, for the last three-and-a-half decades, it’s been broadcasting a dull, monotonous tone. Every few seconds it’s joined by a second sound, like some ghostly ship sounding its foghorn. Then the drone continues.

Once or twice a week, a man or woman will read out some words in Russian, such as “dinghy” or “farming specialist”. And that’s it. Anyone, anywhere in the world can listen in, simply by tuning a radio to the frequency 4625 kHz.

It’s so enigmatic, it’s as if it was designed with conspiracy theorists in mind. Today the station has an online following numbering in the tens of thousands, who know it affectionately as “the Buzzer”. It joins two similar mystery stations, “the Pip” and the “Squeaky Wheel”. As their fans readily admit themselves, they have absolutely no idea what they are listening to.

In fact, no-one does. “There’s absolutely no information in the signal,” says David Stupples, an expert in signals intelligence from City University, London.

What’s going on?

The frequency is thought to belong to the Russian military, though they’ve never actually admitted this. It first began broadcasting at the close of the Cold War, when communism was in decline. Today it’s transmitted from two locations – the St Petersburg site and a location near Moscow. Bizarrely, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, rather than shutting down, the station’s activity sharply increased.

There’s no shortage of theories to explain what the Buzzer might be for – ranging from keeping in touch with submarines to communing with aliens. One such idea is that it’s acting as a “Dead Hand” signal; in the event Russia is hit by a nuclear attack, the drone will stop and automatically trigger a retaliation. No questions asked, just total nuclear obliteration on both sides.


Intriguingly, there is a station with some striking similarities. The “Lincolnshire Poacher” ran from the mid-1970s to 2008. Just like the Buzzer, it could be heard on the other side of the planet. Just like the Buzzer, it emanated from an undisclosed location, thought to be somewhere in Cyprus. And just like the Buzzer, its transmissions were just plain creepy.

At the beginning of every hour, the station would play the first two bars of an English folk tune, the Lincolnshire Poacher.

“Oh ‘tis my delight on a shining night

In the season of the year

When I was bound apprentice in famous Lincolnshire

‘Twas well I served my master for nigh on seven years…”

After repeating this12 times, it would move on to messages read by the disembodied voice of a woman reading groups of five numbers – “1-2-0-3-6” – in a clipped, upper-class English accent.


This isn’t the Buzzer. Instead, many believe that the station is a hybrid of two things. The constant drone is just a marker, saying “this frequency is mine, this frequency is mine…” to stop people from using it.

It only becomes a numbers station in moments of crisis, such as if Russia were invaded. Then it would function as a way to instruct their worldwide spy network and military forces on standby in remote areas. After all, this is a country around 70 times the size of the UK.

It seems they’re already been practicing. “In 2013 they issued a special message, ‘COMMAND 135 ISSUED’ that was said to be test message for full combat readiness,” says Māris Goldmanis, a radio enthusiast who listens to the station from his home in the Baltic states.

The mystery of the Russian radio may have been solved. But if its fans are right, let’s just hope that drone never stops.  


RE: The ghostly radio station that no one claims to run - UglyNRude - 08-03-2017

Interesting, Lets hope we never find out about it being an automated system in the case of a nuclear attack.

RE: The ghostly radio station that no one claims to run - Kayt - 08-03-2017

Numbers stations have been around for years & during the cold war there were a lot of them. And the logic behind them is unknown, but at times of tension, such as during the Iraq War & just after the Russian invasion of Crimea, activity did increase.
The most probably reason for them is to deter others from using that frequency. A spy or similar network can monitor a frequncy & optimise their receiving station for it, but it's not until it's needed that anything of importance is passed.
These stations could be the equivalent of this..

[Image: tumblr_inline_nk6he3wPaM1t8yszb.jpg]

It simply keeps others off a desired frequency / sunbed.

The budgets are serious for some of these stations. The following is an image of one of the antenna systems used. It is the biggest I know of, but it gives you some idea of the budgets involved.

[Image: russian-woodpecker.jpeg]

RE: The ghostly radio station that no one claims to run - Chevleia - 01-01-2018

Fascinating read! This would definitely be creepy to stumble upon late at night while going through radio stations  White face

RE: The ghostly radio station that no one claims to run - ThisisDog - 01-02-2018

I got my Amazon echo to pick it up a while ago. It's hard to explain but even though I knew it was something man made and not paranormal it still made me feel uneasy. It's weird.