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Fairy books - Printable Version

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Fairy books - Llyr - 03-29-2016

Hey everyone,

Figure this is the place I'm most likely to get some good answers.

I'm a really avid reader. Like a serious bookworm. My favourite aspect of the paranormal/magical/mythological etcwhatever; is fairies, and other hidden folk. However, it seems that outside of actual fairy-tales and children's books, fairies aren't really a hugely written about topic.

I'm looking for more adult books about fairies (when I say adult books, I don't mean erotica I just mean "not teen books or YA horror-romance" (not that ther'es anything wrong with any of those, just not what I'm looking for!)).

The only one's I've read so far that fit what I'm trying to find are

Jonathon Strange and Mister Norrel - Susanna Clarke
Once... - James Herbert

Anybody got any more?

Llyr


RE: Fairy books - Darkforeboding - 03-29-2016

Here's one that is more non-fiction; A Field Guide to the Little People by Nancy Arrowsmith and George Moorse. It looks a little comical but it is actually a fairly well researched guide to different folklore about fae folk in several countries.

I haven't read Tommyknockers by Stephen King, but I know that the beings from which it is based are fae folk that supposedly inhabit caves, tunnels and mines. I don't think King actually stuck directly with the folklore but you could give it a try.


RE: Fairy books - Llyr - 03-29-2016

(03-29-2016, 08:19 AM)Darkforeboding Wrote: Here's one that is more non-fiction; A Field Guide to the Little People by Nancy Arrowsmith and George Moorse. It looks a little comical but it is actually a fairly well researched guide to different folklore about fae folk in several countries.

I haven't read Tommyknockers by Stephen King, but I know that the beings from which it is based are fae folk that supposedly inhabit caves, tunnels and mines. I don't think King actually stuck directly with the folklore but you could give it a try.

I'll give the first one a try, thanks!

I've read Tommyknockers, and I know the creatures you're talking about, but King's book is about a crashed alien ship. Not fairies, but still a pretty good read!

Llyr


RE: Fairy books - starpixie - 03-29-2016

One that I really enjoyed was The World Guide to Gnomes, Fairies, Elves & Other Little People by
Thomas Keightley. It can be a bit difficult to read but entirely worth it.


RE: Fairy books - Janus - 11-04-2016

R J Stewart. Robert Kirk: Walker between worlds.

"The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies."

"Robert Kirk's "Secret Commonwealth" was the first work of its kind to be published in the English language, and it has long been a primary source for the study of Highland Fairy lore and the Second Sight."

Walker between worlds, is well worth the read regardless of your beliefs.